SARS-CoV-2 in animals, including pets

(information/article provided by the AVMA)

Updated April 5, 2020

Pets in homes with owners with COVID-19

It appears that dogs and cats are not readily infected with SARS-CoV-2, we have little to no evidence that they become ill, and no evidence that those that may be naturally infected spread SARS-CoV-2 to other pets or people.

Out of an abundance of caution and until more is known about this virus, if you are ill with COVID-19 you should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just as you would restrict your contact with other people. When possible, have another member of your household or business take care of feeding and otherwise caring for any animals, including pets. If you have a service animal or you must care for your animals, including pets, wear a cloth facemask; don’t pet, don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with your pet or service animal. You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home.

Additional guidance on managing pets in homes where people are sick with COVID-19 is available from the CDC. 

Keeping pets safe

For responsible pet owners, preparing in advance is key. Make sure you have an emergency kit prepared, with at least two weeks’ worth of your pet’s food and any needed medications. Usually we think about emergency kits like this in terms of what might be needed for an evacuation, but it’s also good to have one prepared in the case of quarantine or self-isolation when you cannot leave your home.

While we are recommending these as good practices, it is important to remember that there is currently no reason at this time to think that domestic animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection with SARS-CoV-2. Accordingly, there is no reason to remove pets from homes where COVID-19 has been identified in members of the household, unless there is risk that the pet itself is not able to be cared for appropriately. In this emergency, pets and people each need the support of the other and veterinarians are there to support the good health of both.  

What we know about COVID-19 in other species

DOGS IN HONG KONG 

On Thursday, February 27, Hong Kong’s Agriculture, Fisheries, and Conservation Department (AFCD) reported that samples obtained on February 26 from the nasal and oral cavities of a quarantined 17-year-old Pomeranian whose owner had been diagnosed with COVID-19 had tested “weak positive” for SARS-CoV-2, using a real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT PCR) test. Results from a rectal swab and fecal sample were negative. The RRT PCR test is sensitive, specific, and does not cross-react with other coronaviruses of dogs or cats. A “weak positive” result suggests a small quantity of SARS-CoV-2 RNA was present in the samples, but does not distinguish between RNA detected from intact virus and that detected from fragments of viral RNA.

PCR testing was repeated on samples collected February 28, March 2, 5, and 9 with continued “weak positive” results on nasal cavity samples. In addition, gene sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 from the Pomeranian and its close human contacts was completed on March 12 and the viral sequences were very similar. Results of a virus neutralizing antibody test on a sample collected March 3 were also available on March 12 and were negative, but further serological testing on that blood sample performed by the WHO reference laboratory yielded positive results, suggesting that the Pomeranian had developed an immune response to the virus. Virus isolation was performed with negative results. Results of RT PCR conducted on nasal samples on March 12 and 13 were also negative, and the dog was released to its owner on the following day.

Experts from the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong and the College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences of the City University of Hong Kong believe the consistency and persistence of the results suggest the virus may have spread from the infected people to the Pomeranian in this particular case. Testing was conducted by the laboratories of the AFCD and the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong. The latter is an accredited reference laboratory for the WHO for the testing of SARS-COV-2.

The Pomeranian was one of two pet dogs under quarantine. The second pet dog had consistently negative results of tests for the virus. Neither dog showed any signs of respiratory disease during quarantine. Unfortunately, the Pomeranian that tested positive reportedly passed away three days after release. The dog was 17 years old and had ongoing health issues that were likely responsible for the death of this dog, rather than COVID-19.

On March 18, the AFCD reported that a two-year-old German Shepherd Dog, whose owner had tested positive for COVID-19, had also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, using RRT-PCR. The dog also had positive results of a test on March 19 and then negative results on March 23. Another mixed-breed dog from the same residence tested negative. Neither dog has shown signs of respiratory disease. Both dogs are in quarantine and are continuing to be monitored and tested.

As of March 25, the AFCD had conducted tests on 17 dogs and 8 cats from households with confirmed COVID-19 human cases, or people in close contact with confirmed patients, and only 2 dogs (described above) had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.

CAT IN BELGIUM

During the third week of March, the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) in Belgium reported it was informed on March 18 by the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liege that viral RNA of SARS-CoV-2 was detected by PCR (RRT-PCR and high throughput sequencing PCR; specifics not provided) in the feces and vomit of a cat with digestive and respiratory clinical signs. The cat was owned by a person infected with SARS-CoV-2, but according to the Scientific Committee of the FASFC it is not known whether the sequences of virus in the cat and the owner were similar.

Information is not available regarding what other conditions potentially leading to respiratory or gastrointestinal signs were considered or evaluated for this cat. The cat reportedly became ill one week after its owner had returned from Italy, but the date samples were collected in relationship to when the cat’s clinical signs first appeared and how those samples were collected (e.g., directly from the cat, off the floor) are also not known. Because other etiologic causes for the cat’s illness appear to have not been excluded and little is known about the samples in which viral material was detected, a clear link between the presence of viral material and clinical signs consistent with coronavirus infection cannot be established. The condition of the cat reportedly improved 9 days after onset of clinical signs.

CAT IN HONG KONG

On March 30, the AFCD reported that a pet cat that lived in a residence with an individual confirmed to be ill with COVID-19 had tested positive, using RRT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 via oral cavity, nasal, and rectal samples. Results of testing of oral and nasal swab samples collected on April 1 were also positive. The cat is in quarantine and has exhibited no clinical signs of disease.

TIGER IN NEW YORK ZOO

On April 5, the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in one tiger in a zoo in New York. This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with COVID-19. Samples from the tiger were obtained and tested after several lions and tigers at the zoo showed clinical signs of respiratory illness. Public health officials believe the large cats became sick after exposure to an employee who was actively shedding virus. The zoo was closed in mid-March and the first tiger began showing clinical signs on March 27. All of the large cats are expected to recover and no other animals in the zoo are exhibiting clinical signs of disease. USDA and CDC are continuing to monitor the animals, and state animal and public health officials will determine whether other animals, at this zoo or in other areas, should be tested for SARS-CoV-2. The OIE will also be notified.

FROM THE LITERATURE

preprint of a research article posted online on March 30 at bioRxiv has raised public concern that cats and ferrets might be able to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 and transmit the virus to other animals. A 2003 Brief Communication published in the journal Nature during the SARS outbreak similarly provided results of the experimental infection of cats and ferrets with the related virus, SARS-CoV. We emphasize caution in not overinterpreting the results described in these articles, and also not extrapolating them to the potential for SARS-CoV-2 to naturally infect or be transmitted by companion animals kept as pets. Our rationale is as follows:

  • Papers published at bioRxiv are preliminary reports that have not been peer-reviewed. A disclaimer on the website notes papers posted there “should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or be reported in news media as established information.”
  • Experimentally induced infection does not mirror naturally induced infection. Just because an animal can be experimentally infected with a virus does not mean that it will be naturally infected with that same virus.
  • The numbers of animals used in these experiments were very small and the conclusions drawn are based on data points collected from these very few animals—in some cases, as few as two animals were included.
  • Only two of six uninfected cats in the 2020 study became infected via transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from experimentally infected cats. Results from so few animals should not be used as conclusive evidence that infected cats can readily transmit COVID-19, particularly under natural conditions.

A second preprint, posted on April 3 at bioRxiv, described an investigation into the possibility that cats were exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and mounted an antibody response against the virus during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. Again, a disclaimer on the bioRxiv website notes papers posted there “should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or be reported in news media as established information.”

  • Blood was collected from 39 cats prior to the onset of the outbreak (March-May 2019) and 102 cats after the onset (January-March 2020) and sera stored before testing.
  • Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were not detected in any samples collected prior to the outbreak, suggesting that virus was not circulating in Wuhan prior to the onset of the outbreak
  • After the outbreak, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies were detected in 15 of 102 serum samples obtained from cats (14.7%). These 15 cats either lived with an owner who had COVID-19 (n=3), at a veterinary clinic (n=6), or on the street as strays until they were moved to an animal shelter after the onset of the outbreak (n=7).
  • It was not reported how many of the 87 cats that were seronegative for SARS-CoV-2 lived with people who had COVID-19. 
  • Eleven of the ELISA-positive samples were also positive via a tissue culture-based virus neutralizing test (VNT). The highest titers of neutralizing antibodies (1:360 or 1:1080) were found in samples from the three cats that lived with owners who had COVID-19; four cats did not have detectable neutralizing antibodies, and all other titers were < 1:40.
  • The results of serology from more than 100 cats in Wuhan during the peak of the outbreak provide initial evidence that cats can be exposed to the virus, likely by infected people, and mount an antibody response.
  • However, the low seroconversion rate and low to non-existent titers of virus neutralizing antibodies in all but the three cats who lived with people diagnosed with COVID-19 suggests that cats may not be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2 under natural conditions.
  • The significance of this low level of exposure resulting in seroconversion to development of virus-mediated disease in cats or transmission of the virus from cats to other animals, including people, is not known.

Nothing in these research articles provides conclusive evidence that cats, ferrets, or other domestic animals can be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2, nor do they demonstrate that cats, ferrets or other domestic animals transmit the virus under natural conditions.

Despite the number of global cases of COVID-19 surpassing the one million mark as of April 2, 2020, we have only seen examples of two dogs and one cat in Hong Kong, and a tiger in New York, that had positive results of tests for infection. None of the dogs or cats determined to be positive showed signs of illness consistent with COVID-19. The two dogs and one cat lived closely with one or more people with a confirmed diagnosis and clinical symptoms of COVID-19. No conclusions can responsibly be drawn regarding the cat in Belgium because of questions surrounding collection and analysis of samples for testing for SARS-CoV-2 and the absence of an evaluation of that cat for other, more common causes for its clinical signs. The tiger was said to be exposed via contact with a zoo employee who was actively shedding virus, and some other large cats at the zoo that were apparently housed in proximity did exhibit signs of respiratory disease, but are expected to recover. There have been no reports of pets or livestock becoming ill with COVID-19 in the United States. At this point in time, there is also no evidence that domestic animals, including pets and livestock, can spread COVID-19 to people.

Therefore, the AVMA maintains its recommendations regarding SARS-CoV-2 and companion animals. These recommendations, which are supported by guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), indicate that:

  • Animal owners without symptoms of COVID-19 should continue to practice good hygiene during interactions with animals. This includes washing hands before and after such interactions or handling animal food, waste, or supplies.
  • Out of an abundance of caution, and until more is known about the virus, those ill with COVID-19 should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just as you would restrict your contact with other people. Have another member of your household or business take care of feeding and otherwise caring for any animals, including pets.  If you have a service animal or you must care for your animals, including pets, then wear a facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them, and wash your hands before and after any contact with them.
  • There have been no reports of pets or livestock becoming ill with COVID-19 in the United States. At this point in time, there is also no evidence that domestic animals, including pets and livestock, can spread COVID-19 to people.

Companion animals should not be routinely tested for COVID-19 at this time. Animals that are ill or injured should receive veterinary care. The owner or animal caretaker should first consult with the veterinarian via phone to determine whether an in-clinic examination is needed. Where appropriate, testing for infectious diseases that commonly cause companion animal illness should be conducted. If a new, concerning illness is observed that cannot be otherwise explained, and the companion animal has had close and prolonged contact with a person with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infection, the veterinarian should contact the state public health veterinarian or designated health official to discuss whether or not there is a need to test that animal for COVID-19.

While these are recommended as good practices, it is important to remember that there is currently little to no evidence that pets or other domestic animals that are naturally exposed to SARS-CoV-2 become sick with COVID-19 or spread the virus to other domestic animals, and no evidence that they can transmit SARS-CoV-2 to people. Accordingly, there is no reason to remove pets from homes even if COVID-19 has been identified in members of the household, unless there is risk that the pet itself is not able to be cared for appropriately. During this pandemic emergency, pets and people each need the support of the other and veterinarians are there to support the good health of both.

Testing companion animals

With the exception of the single report of illness in a cat in Belgium, which could not be confirmed, there have not been additional reports of pets or other domestic animals becoming ill subsequent to natural exposure to SARS-CoV-2, and there is no reason to think that domestic animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. To date, the CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States. As such, routine testing of domestic animals for COVID-19 is not being recommended by the AVMA, CDC, USDA, or the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD). Because the situation is ever-evolving, public and animal health officials may decide to test certain animals out of an abundance of caution. In the United States, the decision to test will made collaboratively between local, state, and federal animal and public health officials. Answers to questions frequently asked by state animal and public health officials and the public are available from USDA.

After the decision is made to test, state animal health officials will designate a state-appointed veterinarian, USDA-accredited veterinarian, or foreign animal disease diagnostician to collect the sample using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and sample collection methods.

Again, current expert understanding is that COVID-19 is primarily transmitted person-to-person. This supports a recommendation against testing of domestic animals for SARS-CoV-2, except by official order. If domestic animals, including dogs or cats, present with respiratory or gastrointestinal signs, veterinarians should test for more common pathogens and conditions.

If your pet is experiencing any signs of illness, especially respiratory disease, it would be best to contact your veterinarian for proper advice. Curbside Veterinary Clinic is a fully mobile veterinary practice that is well poised to deliver veterinary care to you while you remain home safely! Our policies and procedures during this unprecedented time are such that our primary concerns are for your and our safety as we navigate through this health crisis. Please feel free to call us with your questions and concerns. We will continue to update you on any further medical developments as they are made available to the veterinary community.

COVID-19 & OUR PETS

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(IMAGE PROVIDED BY PROSPECT.ORG)

COVID-19 AND OUR PETS:  FAQ’S

We know and understand the concerns the public is showing regarding this pandemic with the coronavirus COVID-19.  We also know that many of our clients, and pet owners in general, have many questions regarding this viral infection and the potential impact, if any, this will have on our beloved pets and their veterinary care.  We have compiled very current information for you answering some common questions regarding this constantly evolving situation directly from the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association).  Please read it thoroughly, as it will likely address many questions or concerns you have with regard to your pets.  And please know that we are here to help answer your inquiries as best we know how.

A RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM THE AVMA

(AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019

Updated as of 3:00 p.m. Central Time, Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Below are answers to some questions we have received about Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2. The AVMA has additional information and resources available at avma.org/Coronavirus. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

GENERAL

Q: Hong Kong’s Agriculture, Fisheries, and Conservation Department (AFCD) has indicated that a pet dog whose owner had contracted COVID-19 had been tested for SARS-CoV-2 and that multiple tests over several days’ time had come back “weak positive.” Do you have more information, and should we be worried for our pets or for ourselves?

A: The ACFD first collected samples from the pet dog, reportedly a 17-year-old Pomeranian, on February 26 and detected low levels of SARS-CoV-2 material in samples from its nasal and oral cavities on February 27. The ACFD repeated the test on February 28 and March 2 with continued “weak positive” results (nasal and oral sample, nasal sample, respectively). “Weak positive” suggests a small quantity of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the samples. It doesn’t distinguish whether the samples contain intact viruses, which are infectious, or only fragments of the RNA. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) testing was conducted by the laboratories of the AFCD and the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong. The latter is an accredited reference laboratory for the WHO for the testing of SARS-CoV-2. The RT PCR test is sensitive, specific, and does not cross-react with other coronaviruses of dogs or cats. Testing from both laboratories yielded the same results. Experts from the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong, the College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences of the City University of Hong Kong, and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) believe the consistency and persistence of the results suggest the pet dog may have a low-level of infection with the virus. While officials have said this may be a case of human-to-animal transmission, this is still speculative and further testing is being conducted. This pet dog is one of two pet dogs currently under quarantine in separate rooms in a facility at the Hong Kong Port of Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge; the second pet dog has had negative results of tests for the virus. The pet dogs are being cared for and neither has shown any signs of being ill with COVID-19. Furthermore, infectious disease experts and multiple international and domestic human and animal health organizations agree there is no evidence at this point to indicate that pets can spread COVID-19 to other animals, including people.

Q: Can SARS-CoV-2 infect pets?

A: We do not have a clear answer to this at this time. Currently, there is no evidence that pets can become sick. Infectious disease experts, as well as the CDC, OIE, and WHO indicate there is no evidence to suggest that pet dogs or cats can be a source of infection with SARS-CoV-2, including spreading COVID-19 to people. More investigation is underway and as we learn more, we will update you. However, because animals can spread other diseases to people and people can also spread diseases to animals, it’s a good idea to always wash your hands before and after interacting with animals.

FOR PET OWNERS

Q: If I am ill with COVID-19 are there special precautions I should take to prevent spreading disease, including when caring for my pet?

A: If you are sick with COVID-19 you need to be careful to avoid transmitting it to other people. Applying some commonsense measures can help prevent that from happening. Stay at home except to get medical care and call ahead before visiting your doctor. Minimize your contact with other people, including separating yourself from other members of your household who are not ill; using a different bathroom, if available; and wearing a facemask when you are around other people or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. Wash your hands often, especially before touching your face, and use hand sanitizer. Use a tissue if you need to cough or sneeze and dispose of that tissue in the trash. When coughing or sneezing, do so into your elbow or sleeve rather than directly at another person. Out of an abundance of caution, the AVMA recommends you take the same common-sense approach when interacting with your pets or other animals in your home, including service animals. You should tell your physician and public health official that you have a pet or other animal in your home. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. So, if you are ill with COVID-19, have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding, and playing with your pet. If you have a service animal or you must care for your pet, then wear a facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with your pet or service animal. You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. While we are recommending these as good practices, it is important to remember there is currently no evidence that pets can spread COVID-19 to other animals, including people.

Q: What should I do to prepare for my pet’s care in the event I do become ill?

A:  Identify another person in your household who is willing and able to care for your pet in your home should you contract COVID-19. Make sure you have an emergency kit prepared, with at least two weeks’ worth of your pet’s food and any needed medications. Usually we think about emergency kits like this in terms of what might be needed for an evacuation, but it’s also good to have one prepared in the case of quarantine or self-isolation when you cannot leave your home.

Q: My pet or service animal needs to go to the veterinarian – what should I do?

A:  If you are not ill with COVID-19 or another communicable disease (e.g., cold, flu), call your veterinarian to make an appointment for your pet or service animal as you normally would. If you are sick with COVID-19 or another communicable disease, you should stay at home, minimizing contact with other people, until you are well. Accordingly, if this is a non-urgent appointment that needs to be scheduled for your pet or service animal (e.g., annual wellness examination, routine vaccination, elective surgery), you should wait to schedule that appointment until your physician and your public health official believe you no longer present a risk of transmitting your infection to other people you may encounter during such a visit, including owners of pets or other animals and veterinary clinic staff. If you are sick with COVID-19, and you believe your pet or service animal is ill, please seek assistance from your veterinarian and public health official to determine how to best ensure your pet or service animal can be appropriately cared for while minimizing risks of transmitting COVID-19 to other people.

Q: What should I do if my pet or service animal becomes ill after being around someone who has been sick with COVID-19?

A: Talk with the public health official working with the person who is ill with COVID-19. Your public health official can then consult with a public health veterinarian who, in turn, can provide assistance to your veterinarian to ensure your pet or service animal is appropriately evaluated. If the state public health veterinarian recommends that you take your pet or service animal to your veterinarian for an examination, please call your veterinarian in advance to let them know that you are bringing in a sick animal that has been exposed to someone with COVID-19. Advance notice will support the veterinary clinic/hospital in preparing for the proper admittance of that animal, including the preparation of an isolation area as needed. Do not take the animal to a veterinary clinic until you have consulted with the public health official and your veterinarian.

Q: What precautions should be taken for animals that have recently been imported from high-risk areas?

A: Any animals imported into the United States will need to meet CDC and USDA requirements for entering the United States. At this time there is no evidence that animals other than the bat source of SARS-CoV-2 can spread COVID-19. As with any animal introduced into a new environment, recently imported animals should be observed daily for signs of illness. If an animal becomes ill, the animal should be examined by a veterinarian. Call your veterinarian before bringing the animal into the clinic and let them know that the animal was imported from an area identified as high-risk for COVID-19.

Q: Is testing for SARS-CoV-2 available for animals in the United States?

A: No clinical testing is available as of today (3/11/2020) in the United States, but tests and testing capacity are being developed. It is possible that authorization may need to be obtained from a public health or state veterinarian prior to submission of samples. More information on test availability and requirements for submission is expected to be available shortly. It’s important to remember that, while SARS-CoV-2 is suspected to have emerged from bats, there is currently limited evidence that other animals, including pets, can be infected with SARS-CoV-2. There is no evidence to suggest that pets can spread COVID-19 to other people or other pets

We hope that this information was helpful and know that we, at Curbside Veterianry Clinic, are following sanitation protocols recommended by both the AVMA, CDC and WHO and will continue to work with you to ensure a safe environment for your pet’s continued care.  Being a mobile practice, Curbside Vet is especially poised to deliver care to your pets despite the current situation, and we look forward to continuing this service through this difficult time. Please do not hesitate to communicate with us should you need our services; we are here to help you and your beloved pets and answer your questions to the best of our ability.  We also promise to stay abreast of new information as it becomes available and share it with you immediately.  We wish you all safety and health and look forward to putting this matter behind us very soon!

Kindly yours,

Dr. Sherif M. Lawendy & The Entire Staff at Curbside Veterinary Clinic

Feline Hyperthyroidism

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(PHOTO COURTESY OF VIN)

Feline hyperthyroidism is the most common hormonal disease seen in domestic cats.  Commonly afflicting older felines, usually greater than 10 years of age, hyperthyroidism commonly causes other health issues with the heart and kidneys the longer it remains undiagnosed and untreated.  Proper diagnosis and medical work-up will result in appropriate diagnosis and treatment recommendations.  This all starts with annual blood work that specifically screens for this condition in older felines.  We recommend doing thyroid screening starting at 8 years of age once annually and every 6 months after 12 years of age.  Early detection leads to early diagnosis and treatment.  Please click on the attached link to get a more thorough explantion of hyperthyroidism and the available treatment options. If you have any questions, please contact us at 844-VET-2-PET!

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=1197

Oh My Goodness, I found a Growth, What is it?

 

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Certain viruses can cause the growth of skin tumors commonly referred to as “warts”. These viruses are called papillomavirus. They are a common cause for the warts we see in young dogs, often found on the face, ears, lips and mouth (including the tongue) and are formally called, Viral Papilloma (see pics below). These “viral” warts are different than some warts that are found in older dogs. This virus is commonly transmitted between dogs through direct contact with the growth or from the dog’s environment through injury to the skin. It’s important to know that this virus is ONLY transmissible between dogs, not other pets or humans! Viral Papillomas are not typically dangerous, commonly found in young dogs and will often regress on their own. The take home message here is that if you find a growth on the skin of your dog, you should have it evaluated in order to determine if it is a viral growth or a true wart, because their treatment is different. If you notice a growth on your pet, call us and schedule a consultation so that we can put your mind at ease! If you are interested in knowing more about viral papillomas, read this article: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=465

(PHOTOS COURTESY OF VIN)

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“Spring” Into Action!

Lilies

After the hard winter we’ve had this year, we are all more than happy to receive the comforts and warmth of Spring!  Aside from the joys of seeing all that snow melt away, we welcome the birth of the new season foliage with all its beautiful colors and smells.  Unfortunately, dangers also accompany this transition in seasons.  Certain plants and flowers, although pleasing to our senses, can be extremely dangerous to your pets and horses.  A floral favorite, Lilies are a primary culprit for our feline friends.  This beautiful flower has very serious toxic affects on the kidneys of a cat for unknown reasons.  Ingesting any part of this plant, or pollen, can cause serious injury.  So before going out and buying your Spring bouquet, read this article http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/17-poisonous-plants by the ASPCA Poison Control Center on Plants That Are Poisonous to Pets.  Now, this doesn’t mean you can never buy these plants/flowers ever again.  It just means you have to be more careful with them around your pets.  Understanding the dangers and being informed will only serve to help you make better decisions regarding your pet’s safety.  The ASPCA is a great resource for literature and for emergency situations.  They can be contacted at: Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435   Naturally, we recommend that you also reach out to us if you have cause for concern that your pet or horse may have ingested a toxic plant or flower.  We can be reached 24-HOURS A DAY at (844) VET-2-PET 

 

ePetHealth

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ePetHealth

As a client of Curbside Vet, you will have access to this incredible communications network that gives you immediate availability to all your pet’s medical information, educational materials and videos, appointment request calendar and our online VIPPS-certified veterinary pharmacy with FREE home delivery! Create text or email reminders for yourself for monthly preventatives and setup FREE auto home delivery of your pet’s food! Caring for your pet and complying with their medical needs will be so much easier with ePetHealth and Curbside his happy to offer you this convenience for using our services! We will even have a smartphone app that offers you all these features on the go! If you have any questions about signing up with ePetHealth, don’t hesitate to call us or check out our website (coming soon!)
1-844-VET-2-PET